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TERRY MOELLER

The Old Tree by the Creek

The language of art and design and the techniques of painting and drawing are as important to me as the choice of imagery. My artwork focuses on the light, color, pattern and rhythms found in nature.

TERRY MOELLER

Shadows on the Road

The images in my paintings are from landscapes which I have studied and know intimately. My childhood was spent exploring the countryside of rural East Texas.

 
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TERRY MOELLER

The Green River

This exploration of the landscape creating a lasting impression and continues to inform my work.

TERRY MOELLER

Road to the Valley #3

My vision has also been influenced by artists in earlier centuries who paint in the landscape tradition, including 17thcentury Dutch painters, 19thcentury Romantic and Realist painters. George Inness, an American painter and Jean-Baptist-Camille-Corot, a French artist are two of the artists with whom I feel a connection.

 
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Game of Waste

 "Game of Waste" is an extended cinema work shot in a Cedar Forest  the Luberon region of France. We are sentient hunters and consumers  moving to the tick of technology, on metamodernity's trajectory of  great excitement and yet great  precariousness.  
This looped film is a moving painting in the "Anthropocene Lounge." The Lounge is an invitation to sit at the cedar slab table, read the literature, and think.

DENISE CARSON

Deep

The work "Deep" was a  new piece created specifically for the exhibition.  The title refers to a children's Bible school song referring to "a fountain running deep and wide".  In the song the lyrics are acted out. The scale of the work is the width of the word wide in the song lyrics.  The height is the approximate size of a large child.  The dry pigment is implemented as metaphor for water flowing visually.  The visual similarity to French artist Yves Klein ultramarine blue work is intended to be apparent to the viewer but not literal as the work has many layers of other works underneath below the surface.  The painting maybe touched.  But like nature you may wish you did not touch it as you will be marked by the painting itself.